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HS Subjects/Courses

High School – English Language Arts

English I

The expectations are organized into the strands of Reading, Writing, Speaking/Listening, and Language. The Reading standards establish a staircase of increasing complexity in what students must be able to read and comprehend in order to meet the demands of college and career level texts. The Writing standards promote writing throughout the grade levels by fostering the ability to write logical arguments based on substantive claims, sound reasoning, and relevant evidence. The Speaking and Listening standards require that students be able to gain, evaluate, and present increasingly complex information, ideas, and evidence. The Language standards include vocabulary and convention standards. Although Language standards are identified in a separate strand, they should not be taught, learned, and implemented in isolation but should be used and developed throughout reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

The English I course provides a foundational study of literary genres (novels, short stories, poetry, drama, literary nonfiction). It should include influential U.S. documents and one Shakespearean play.

English II

The expectations are organized into the strands of Reading, Writing, Speaking/Listening, and Language. The Reading standards establish a staircase of increasing complexity in what students must be able to read and comprehend in order to meet the demands of college and career level texts. The Writing standards promote writing throughout the grade levels by fostering the ability to write logical arguments based on substantive claims, sound reasoning, and relevant evidence. The Speaking and Listening standards require that students be able to gain, evaluate, and present increasingly complex information, ideas, and evidence. The Language standards include vocabulary and convention standards. Although Language standards are identified in a separate strand, they should not be taught, learned, and implemented in isolation but should be used and developed throughout reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

English II introduces literary global perspectives focusing on literature from the Americas (Caribbean, Central, South, and North), Africa, Eastern Europe, Asia, Oceania, and the Middle East. Influential U.S. documents and a Shakespearean play should be included.

English III

The expectations are organized into the strands of Reading, Writing, Speaking/Listening, and Language. The Reading standards establish a staircase of increasing complexity in what students must be able to read and comprehend in order to meet the demands of college and career level texts. The Writing standards promote writing throughout the grade levels by fostering the ability to write logical arguments based on substantive claims, sound reasoning, and relevant evidence. The Speaking and Listening standards require that students be able to gain, evaluate, and present increasingly complex information, ideas, and evidence. The Language standards include vocabulary and convention standards. Although Language standards are identified in a separate strand, they should not be taught, learned, and implemented in isolation but should be used and developed throughout reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

English III is an in-depth study of U.S. literature and U.S. literary nonfiction especially foundational works and documents from the 17th century through the early 20th century. At least one Shakespearean play should be included.

English IV

The expectations are organized into the strands of Reading, Writing, Speaking/Listening, and Language. The Reading standards establish a staircase of increasing complexity in what students must be able to read and comprehend in order to meet the demands of college and career level texts. The Writing standards promote writing throughout the grade levels by fostering the ability to write logical arguments based on substantive claims, sound reasoning, and relevant evidence. The Speaking and Listening standards require that students be able to gain, evaluate, and present increasingly complex information, ideas, and evidence. The Language standards include vocabulary and convention standards. Although Language standards are identified in a separate strand, they should not be taught, learned, and implemented in isolation but should be used and developed throughout reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

English IV completes the global perspective initiated in English II. Though its focus is on European (Western, Southern, Northern) literature, this course includes important U.S. documents and literature (texts influenced by European philosophy or action). At least one Shakespearean play should be included.

High School – Math

Algebra I

Algebra 1 continues the study of algebraic concepts. It includes operations with polynomials and matrices, creation and application of linear functions and relations, algebraic representations of geometric relationships, and an introduction to nonlinear functions. Students will be expected to describe and translate among graphic, algebraic, numeric, tabular, and verbal representations of relations and use those representations to solve problems. Appropriate technology, from manipulatives to calculators and application software, should be used regularly for instruction and assessment.

Geometry

Geometry continues students’ study of geometric concepts building upon middle school topics. Students will move from an inductive approach to deductive methods of proof in their study of two- and three-dimensional geometric figures. Reasoning skills will be emphasized and students will broaden their use of the coordinate plane. Appropriate technology, from manipulatives to calculators and graphics software, should be used regularly for instruction and assessment.

Algebra II

Algebra 2 continues students’ study of advanced algebraic concepts including functions, polynomials, rational expressions, systems of functions and inequalities, and matrices. Students will be expected to describe and translate among graphic, algebraic, numeric, tabular, and verbal representations of relations and use those representations to solve problems. Emphasis should be placed on practical applications and modeling. Appropriate technology, from manipulatives to calculators and application software, should be used regularly for instruction and assessment.

Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus provides students an honors-level study of trigonometry, advanced functions, analytic geometry, and data analysis in preparation for calculus. Applications and modelling should be included throughout the course of study. Appropriate technology, from manipulatives to calculators and application software, should be used regularly for instruction and assessment.

High School – Science

Physical Science

The Physical Science curriculum is designed to continue the investigation of the physical sciences begun in earlier grades. The Physical Science course will build a rich knowledge base to provide a foundation for the continued study of science. The investigations should be approached in both a qualitative and quantitative manner in keeping with the developing mathematical skills of the students. The unifying concepts and program strands provide a context for teaching content and process skill goals. All goals should focus on the unifying concepts: Systems, Order and Organization, Evidence, Models, and Explanation, Constancy, Change, and Measurement, Evolution and Equilibrium, Form and Function.

Students will cover the following topics: scientific inquiry, forces and motion, energy and its conservation, electricity and magnetism, the structure and properties of matter, the regularities in chemistry.

Biology

Learners will study biological systems. The strands and unifying concepts provide a context for teaching content and process skill goals. Instruction should focus on the following unifying concepts: Systems, Order and Organization, Evidence, Models, and Explanation, Constancy, Change, and Measurement, Evolution and Equilibrium, Form and Function.

Students will cover the following topics: scientific inquiry, the physical, chemical and cellular basis of life, continuity of life and the changes of organisms over time, the unity and diversity of life and the ecological relationships among organisms.

Earth Science

The Earth/Environmental science curriculum focuses on the function of Earth’s systems. Emphasis is placed on matter, energy, plate tectonics, environmental awareness, materials availability, and the cycles that circulate energy and material through the earth system. Learners will study natural and technological systems. The program strands and unifying concepts provide a context for teaching content and process skill goals. All goals should focus on the unifying concepts: Systems, Order and Organization, Evidence, Models, and Explanation, Constancy, Change, and Measurement, Evolution and Equilibrium, Form and Function.

Students will cover the following topics: scientific inquiry, lithospheric materials, tectonic process, human and environmental impacts of natural and human-induced changes in the lithosphere, the origin and evolution of the earth system, the hydrosphere and its interactions and influences on the lithosphere, the atmosphere and environmental quality, the dynamics and composition of the atmosphere and its local and global processes influencing climate and air quality, the earth in the solar system and its position in the universe.

High School – Social Studies

World History

World History at the ninth grade level is a survey course that gives students the opportunity to explore recurring themes of human experience common to civilizations around the globe from ancient to contemporary times. An historical approach will be at the center of the course. The application of the themes of geography and an analysis of the cultural traits of civilizations will help students understand how people shape their world and how their world shapes them. As students examine the historical roots of significant events, ideas, movements, and phenomena, they encounter the contributions and patterns of living in civilizations around the world. Students broaden their historical perspectives as they explore ways societies have dealt with continuity and change, exemplified by issues such as war and peace, internal stability and strife, and the development of institutions. To become informed citizens, students require knowledge of the civilizations that have shaped the development of the United States. World History provides the foundation that enables students to acquire this knowledge which will be used in the study of Civics and Economics and United States History.

Civics and Economics

Through the study of Civics and Economics, students will acquire the skills and knowledge necessary to become responsible and effective citizens in an interdependent world. Students will need a practical understanding of these systems of civics and economics that affect their lives as consumers and citizens. Furthermore, this course serves as a foundation for United States History. It is recommended that this tenth grades course, Civics and Economics, directly precede the eleventh grade United States History survey course to maintain continuity and build historical perspective. As informed decision makers, students will apply acquired knowledge to real life experiences. When studying the legal and political systems, students will become aware of their rights and responsibilities and put this information into practice. The economic, legal, and political systems are balanced for presentation and, like other social studies subjects, this course lends itself to interdisciplinary teaching. The goals and objectives are drawn from disciplines of political science, history, economics, geography, and jurisprudence.

U.S. History

The study of United States History in the eleventh grade is designed as a survey course and a continuation of the Civics and Economics curriculum. After the study of Civics and Economics, this survey course will begin with the national period and the administration of George Washington. Throughout the competency goals, there will be some overlap of time periods to allow for teacher flexibility and to address the complexity of the issues and events. The overall curriculum continues to current times. The focus of this course provides students with a framework for studying political, social, economic, and cultural issues, and for analyzing the impact these issues have had on American society. This course goes beyond memorization of isolated facts to the development of higher level thinking skills, encouraging students to make historical assessments and evaluations.

High School – Foreign Languages

French and Spanish I

This course is an introduction to the study of the target language and its culture. Students perform the most basic functions of the language and become familiar with some elements of its culture. The emphasis is placed on the development of the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing within a given context extending outside of the classroom setting when possible. The context focuses on the students’ lives and experiences and includes an exposure to everyday customs and lifestyles. Grammar is integrated throughout the course and is selected according to the language conventions (functions).

A general introduction to the culture, its products (e.g., literature, laws, foods, games,) perspectives (e.g., attitudes, values, beliefs,) and practices (patterns of social interaction) is integrated throughout the course. Students acquire some insight into how languages and cultures work by comparing the target language and culture(s) to their own. Integration of other disciplines is on-going throughout the course.

French and Spanish II

Students enrolled in this course have either successfully completed the level I course at the high school or the middle school or have placed out of level I due to previous language study at the elementary and/or middle grades.

This course provides students with opportunities to continue the development of their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students participate in simple conversational situations by combining and recombining learned elements of the language orally and in writing. They are able to satisfy basic survival needs and interact on issues of everyday life in the present time and past time inside and outside of the classroom setting.

They compose related sentences, which narrate, describe, compare, summarize familiar topics from the target culture. Focus is placed on understanding main ideas. They develop a better understanding of the similarities and differences between cultures and languages and they examine the influence of the beliefs and values on the target culture(s). Integration of other disciplines is on-going throughout the course.

Physical Education and Healthful Living

Students will cover the following topics: apply competent motor skills and movement patterns needed to perform a variety of physical activities ; understand concepts, principles, strategies, and tactics that apply to the learning and performance of movement; understand the importance of achieving and maintaining a health-enhancing level of physical fitness; use behavioral strategies that are responsible and enhance respect of self and others and value activity.